Stack and Tilt Golf Swing




There is a popular golf swing method and it is called the Stack and Tilt golf swing. It is a simple golf theory, but the results are fabulous. All the PGA tour players who have adapted to this swing are having remarkable results.

I first heard of it myself only two weeks ago when I had to see my pro, Linda Rennick, for a slight correction in my irons (this slump has lasted over 3 months and it just wasn't working itself out). We discovered I was in a limbo with my swing, not having a traditional pivot but not yet a true "Stack and Tilt" as it has been described to me.

I have always "kind'a" threw my left knee out a tad, and tried to have the traditional weight shift at the same time, but now they both were working against me. I was then trying to over swing and just get it over with so I could go on to the club that didn't give me this heartburn. I also shortened up my stance way to much, and I down to 12 inches between my feet. I have seen so many women with such broad stances, so much wider than their entire bodies and it always looked so awkward and I then in turn have shortened mine so much that I didn't even have anything between my feet. It never ceases to amaze me, that we can loose something we have had no problems with for years, and then we get a little sloppy then a little more and then before you know it we have destroyed that particular part of our game.

We golfers are always looking for new methods and ways to improve our game and trying to do things that will give us an edge. The "Stack and Tilt" golf swing is being hailed as the swing of the future (but I found so much of the past in the actual execution it just felt old, old, old school). It is very efficient and your contact with the ball is much more consistent. You will hit the ball in the same place more often than not.

The original method of the "Stack and Tilt" was being taught by Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett, regular golf swing instructors. "Stack and Tilt" derives it's name from the fact that it "stacks" the golfers weight over the golf ball creating much better contact.

Here are the problems with the conventional swing:

  1. Weight shift-trying to let the club bring your body to a coil on the back swing shifting your weight to the right leg (right hand golfers).
  2. Weight shift on down swing-trying to have the club bring you out of the coil and shift back your weight to the opposite leg at impact.
  3. Timing must be perfect.
  4. Release-if the weight isn't shifted at the correct moment the ball will not be hit consistently.

The core of the "Stack and Tilt" golf swing:

  1. No weight shift away from the ball.
  2. Weight stays primarily on the "lead" foot.
  3. Your back stays vertical over the ball (no twisting and going into some distorted body experience).

Setup

The grip is neutral and the weight is 55 to 60 percent on the "front" "lead" foot. The new thing I was taught with this was that I do not have to position the ball from left to right concerning the club I have in my hand (the longer the club the closer to the "lead" foot and as I got a shorter club in my hand the ball's position would move to the heel of the opposite foot). Here we keep the ball almost centered in front of us. Now we can really let the club do the work for us. One's shoulders will be "stacked" over your hips and the spine will be vertical over the ball.

As we take the club away, our hands move more inward and along the chest. The spine "tilts" toward the ball yet remains centered over the ball. Do not let your weight shift to the back foot. You may notice that you will not over swing with this new method and that will be a great thing to have, control of the club, as we make our decent on the downswing.

At the top of the back swing our weight will be stronger on our lead foot (about 65%), our spines are still vertical to the ball. Our back leg has straightened and the lead shoulder is pointed at the ball. The lead knee is flexed forward. Remember to keep the arms riding along the chest. We have a more controlled coil and our torque is more consistent.

The biggest benefit of this method is consistency and the fact that the ball will go further and be more accurate. It will feel like the way a swing should feel without all the contortions and over thinking that goes on while we are standing over that little white ball.



"Stack and Tilt" may not be the method for you, not everyone has the same swing patterns and what may be difficult for some may come easy for others. If you have been struggling with your golf game and nothing has felt natural, and you are wondering what that club is doing in your hand , I recommend looking at the "Stack and Tilt" method. It is almost like that "aaha" moment, it just may click for you. I am working through the demerging of my two golf swings, but I have felt and see the difference in my swing. I am able to concentrate on course management knowing I have better control of my golf club. This method also feels just like it was meant for me, and I had been doing it off and on over my golfing life thinking I was not doing the right conventional swing we were taught, so I would cast it off and try to do it the "right" way. I did ok the old way but there is always too much thinking and losing it too often was predictable. Now I have permission to use it all the time.

Regardless of the weight shift anyone uses one needs to maintain a rhythm and tempo to their swing. Tempo is of utmost importance, it is a part of the discipline of golf. Ryhthm will separate the hackers of the world from those who are golfers. With a consistent tempo will be surprised how your game and swing will improve.

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The Stack and Tilt Swing: The Definitive Guide to the Swing That Is Remaking Golf



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