Golf Tips from the Golf Partners Club's Newsletters:


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GOLF TIPS: Equipment, Travel, Discounts and Deals

I have been a life long member of the PGA Partners Club. They have exciting news about the future of the Club! They are moving in a new direction after 12 great years as partners with the PGA TOUR. Effective January 1, 2010, the Club ceased its affiliation with the TOUR and began a new partnership with GOLF Magazine.

As a result, they are called Golf Partners Club. Going forward, all paid Club members will receive GOLF Magazine every month instead of PGA TOUR Partners every other month. Please visit their new site: Golf Partners Club

I will still be posting these newsletters on a timely basis, and if you would like to join the Golf Partners Club please click this link:

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February 28, 2011

More Grooves, More Grip

Roger Cleveland is a legend in the wedge world, so when he designs new wedges, there's a good chance they're good. And these are, the new Callaway X Series Jaws CC wedges. Key feature: Callaway's Tour CC grooves found only in Callaway's forged wedges and irons.

The forging process, of course, provides a softer feel around the greens, but the real deal is the 21 grooves on the wedges versus the traditional 15. The 21 grooves mean you can get more traction on the ball, which translates into more spin and control.

Callaway also has new bounce options, featuring soles individually designed for maximum versatility especially in firm and tight conditions. Example: In the 58- and 60-degree wedges, options include a zero bounce (great for tight lies around the green) and an eight-degree bounce. The Jaws CC wedges ($119) also have reduced-bounce offerings at 52, 54 and 56 degrees.

Callaway Jaws Series CC Wedge - Chrome

Callaway Jaws Series CC Wedge - Slate




February 24, 2011

Golf Joke Becomes Murder Mystery

You've heard this joke before, perhaps while waiting for a slow foursome or on the 19th hole. Still, it's worth the re-telling because it links to those of us who, upon occasion, fudge our scores a bit.

The dramatization of this joke opens at a crime scene, police cars lit up and an officer reporting to HQ that, "We have a possible homicide. Suspect is on the scene believed to be armed and dangerous."

Screeching tires follow, and stepping from a squad car is the steely-eyed Detective McDuffy. McDuffy, scoffing at protestations of the wimp cops hunched behind their squad cars, pulls his handgun and slowly enters the dark crime scene.

He comes upon the body, a woman. He hears a noise. There's gunfire. A golf ball bounces slowly away from a building. Then, from the shadows, the suspect emerges holding the bloody weapon, a golf club, an iron.


February 23, 2011

Mizuno Driver for Mere Mortals

Mizuno Golf is best known for forged irons and other clubs designed for tour-type golfers, not for commoners who cruise the fringes of muni fairways. But its new JPX-800 driver could change that and heighten the company's profile in metal woods.

The 460cc has a six-piece design and a 5-gram internal weight that helps square the face through impact. The driver, the JPX-800 fairway wood and JPX-800 hybrid, each feature Hot Metal Ultimate Dynamic Stability designed to maximize the horizontal and vertical moment of inertia (MOI) for better distance from anywhere on the club face. In other words, the JPX-800 line has a big sweet spot.

Like the JPX-800 irons, the JPX-800 driver ($299.99) is easy to hit and sounds great on contact. Unlike some of its competition, the JPX-800 driver doesn't need instructions. In other words, it's got sleek, clean lines and is ready to hit right out of the box.


February 22, 2011

Driver Expands Sweet Spot by 30%

The goal of every golfer is to hit the ball on the club's sweet spot. That's the goal, anyway. Cobra Golf is making that easier with its new S3 and S3 Max drivers.

These drivers feature E9 Face Technology that, says Cobra, expands the sweet zone by 30 percent. Cobra created E9 by analyzing 25,000 shots by all calibers of golfers. The company discovered that 99 percent of shots were hit across the face in an elliptical pattern--from low heel to high toe--and not always in the center. Thus, Cobra used this finding to redesign the clubface.

The S3 Max driver differs from the S3 in that its offset design helps golfers straighten out slices and fades, thus maximizing forgiveness and distance. Cobra says most golfers will find they can achieve draw bias ball flight and high launch with the S3 Max.

Cobra Men's S3 Max Driver

Cobra Women's S3 Max Driver


February 15, 2011

New Pro V1: Let's Talk Dimples

On the 10th anniversary of the original Pro V1--which created a paradigm shift in the construction and performance of premium golf balls--Titleist is launching its newest generation of Pro V1 and Pro V1x.

Players with fast enough swing speeds (105 mph plus) to make the Pro V1 and Pro V1x perform to the max will find a more boring trajectory and consistent ball flight in new Pro V1s and increased distance in new Pro V1xs.

Dimples: The new Pro V1 has 352 tetrahedral dimples with five different dimple sizes (the previous generation had 392 dimples) along three axes of symmetry, which gives the ball its improved flight. The new Pro V1x, meanwhile, has a four-piece multi-component design with 328 tetrahedral dimples (previous generation had 332 dimples); there are seven different dimple sizes along three axes of symmetry, which produces a higher trajectory for longer distance.

Titleist Pro V1 Golf Balls 2011 - 12 pack

Titleist Pro V1x High Numbers Golf Balls 2011 - 12 pack

Titleist Pro V1 Golf Balls (One Dozen)


February 10, 2011

Very Handsome, Very Hot Hybrid

Nike Golf always has prided itself in creating clubs with the input of its PGA Tour players. The new VR Pro Hybrid ($169.99) is no exception. Nike Golf staff players Anthony Kim, Francesco Molinari and Carl Pettersson already have put the club in play. No word on whether Eldrick Woods will follow suit this season, but don't count on it given that the Striped One has never used a hybrid in competition.

Nike Golf says the VR Pro Hybrid, featuring Compression Channel technology, delivers more speed on the clubface--a 21 percent hotter clubface than the previous VR Hybrid--for longer, more penetrating shots. In addition, the club is flatter on lower lofts for tighter lies and then deeper on higher lofts for more shot options. The flatter sole of the VR Pro Hybrid keeps more of the club on the ground, which helps the ball stay on the club face longer.

Nike Men's VR Pro Hybrid


February 07, 2011

New Callaway RAZR Hawk Driver

Callaway Golf Company, which introduced Forged Composite in the crown of its Diablo Octane driver, takes the technology further in the new RAZR Hawk drivers.

Both the RAZR's crown and sole are made of Forged Composite, bringing back memories of the all-graphite club head. (Remember the Yamaha Top-Dawg?) But rest assured, the RAZR Hawk sounds and performs better than those all-graphite drivers ever could.

Forged Composite is one-third the density of titanium and, during bending, has a greater load-carrying capacity. "Forged Composite's flexural strength and low density allows us to strategically locate every last gram of weight to increase performance," says Callaway Golf researcher Dr. Alan Hocknell. "Further, the ability to precisely forge the carbon material to within one-thousandth of an inch yields aerodynamic shaping that greatly reduces energy lost to drag during the downswing."

The RAZR Hawk ($399), with a 45.5-inch shaft, will be available February 18.

Callaway Razr Hawk Driver - Womens

Callaway Men's RAZR Hawk Draw Driver

Callaway Razr Hawk Tour Driver


February 03, 2011

Man Up! Stop Playing Wuss Golf

Are you embarrassed when you see a golfer tee off with an 8-iron on a short Par 4? How about when a man hits from the women's tees?

ESPN SportsCenter comedian Kenny Mayne, in his show titled "Mayne Event," goes on a mission, one golf course at a time, to get golfers to man-up and stop playing what he jokingly calls "wuss golf."

Mayne first interviews golf directors, groundskeepers and beverage attendants to find out why golfers play with such fear. Then he goes onto golf courses and driving ranges to call out everyday hackers on their wimpy shot selections and equipment. He tries to convince them--sometimes with a bullhorn at point-blank range--to play golf like a man. You'd either want to laugh at him, or punch him out.






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